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Kenya Discussion / Selina Meyers is really good in veep
« Last post by Globalcitizen12 on Today at 04:26:40 AM »
I am watching veep on HBO. This is a good show. It is very realistic and really does a good job of showing how difficult and intriguing politics is in America..once you get to the executive you lose control and you are always on reactionary mode. Dryefus is good she does a good job. As matter of fact the funny bitch should run for president.
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Kenya Discussion / Re: Mugabe appointed WHO goodwill ambassador
« Last post by Parkerpen on Today at 12:21:06 AM »
 :D :D :D :D :D
They rescinded it. What a horrible idea.
Whoever who recommended it should resign.
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Kenya Discussion / Re: NDII:Benevolent dictatorship is like snake oil
« Last post by Kichwa on October 22, 2017, 11:39:44 PM »
I think ourutu were about to try benevolent dictatorship in Kenya by putting in place an efficient rigging machine that would last for more than two or three decades but incompetence, corruption, tribalism, hubris, etc, woke the people up before it was entrenched and now people are revolting against it.  I think benevolent dictatorship must be proceeded with some kind of national experience and quiet consent.  It is obvious that Kenyans are not consenting to this kind of rule and forcing it on the people will not work and will completely destroy the benevolence part of it. Kenya will be fine if we follow the democratic path as charted-out by our 2010 constitution. Any attempt to sneak anything else will not work.


My interest on this story was the Asian Tigers. Ndii is wrong in discounting the role benevolent dictatorship played in their rapid development.

I am not sure what's good for Kenya given our incompetence and disunity. Benevolent dictatorship has not been tried in our setup - ongoing in Ethiopia and Rwanda. Without industry we are heading nowhere.

Ndii suggests Kenya is better off as a progressive democracy by citing Namibia and Botswana. But we lack their cohesion so he does not convince me.

So, is Ndii right or right in saying that benevolent dictatorship will NOT work for Kenya given our diversity, no history of culture of efficiency and meritocracy,  lack of cultural cohesion, and non-existent history of sense of nationalism, just to mention a few.

Good analysis, suspect timing. Dr Ndii is right about the Asian Tigers and the political progressives success stories in Africa - Botswana, Namibia, Cape Verde, Mauritius. But he ignores their cultural vantage - of singular industriousness and cohesion - which are a decisive success factor. The big elephant China of course is given a wide berth in his essay.

Maybe you can expound on the bold part.  I don't understand it in the context of this article.

China is an interesting place.  Over 1 billion people.  A country where most fraudulent activities are capital offenses.  The only reason he doesn't include them is lack of democracy.  But they seem like they could fit in just well considering all other facets.

Ndii contends the Asian Tigers are not benevolent dictatorships. That their rapid growth was fuelled by an older pre-existing merit system. He says dictatorship breeds corruption and cronysm which cause inefficiency - the Tigers were efficient enough to thrive as export economies and thus cannot have been dictatorships.

I think he ignores benevolence and dwells on dictatorship. It's what we have in China now and in the Tigers before. The totalitarian state that trumples individual rights for the common good. They aver corruption and such vices but more importantly they make consistent smart choices for the country.

It works well in the ASEAN because they have a cultural vantage point. One is a culture of industry. The Japanese and the Chinese have a singular ambitious nationalism. Even now there is a silent agreement between the Chinese and the government to forego some freedoms for development.

The other is cultural cohesion - same race and ethnicity.

Kenya lacks both advantages. We are lazy and entitled. Everyone whines about the sharing and not the baking. This leads to corruption. We are also culturally diverse which is a toxic mix.

Botswana and Namibia have cultural cohesion which has caused political and socioeconomic development. We are yet to see if the Chinese path works for Rwanda and Ethiopia where benevolent dictatorship is in pilot phase.
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Kenya Discussion / Re: NDII:Benevolent dictatorship is like snake oil
« Last post by Robina on October 22, 2017, 10:38:22 PM »
Robina,
Apart from cohesion, I believe Nambia and Botswana have white populations that plays outsized role in their economies relative to their population size. Kenya does have industrialist but they're all of Asian origin. Kenyans of African descent rarely invest in serious businesses the newest crop of millionaires are tenderprenuers.

Yup. The westerners have a freedom dividend which is individual enterprise. Geniuses are a dime a dozen in their history. Democracy in Africa is the right to be entitled and lazy.

I have searched but not been able to find the proper reason for the squalor of the African race. Some say the continent was cut off from the rest of the world for millennia. Others say it's the hot equatorial sun that stunts the biological development.

What do you think hk?
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Kenya Discussion / Re: NDII:Benevolent dictatorship is like snake oil
« Last post by hk on October 22, 2017, 10:25:32 PM »
Robina,
Apart from cohesion, I believe Nambia and Botswana have white populations that plays outsized role in their economies relative to their population size. Kenya does have industrialist but they're all of Asian origin. Kenyans of African descent rarely invest in serious businesses the newest crop of millionaires are tenderprenuers.
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Kenya Discussion / Re: NDII:Benevolent dictatorship is like snake oil
« Last post by Robina on October 22, 2017, 10:00:53 PM »
My interest on this story was the Asian Tigers. Ndii is wrong in discounting the role benevolent dictatorship played in their rapid development.

I am not sure what's good for Kenya given our incompetence and disunity. Benevolent dictatorship has not been tried in our setup - ongoing in Ethiopia and Rwanda. Without industry we are heading nowhere.

Ndii suggests Kenya is better off as a progressive democracy by citing Namibia and Botswana. But we lack their cohesion so he does not convince me.

So, is Ndii right or right in saying that benevolent dictatorship will NOT work for Kenya given our diversity, no history of culture of efficiency and meritocracy,  lack of cultural cohesion, and non-existent history of sense of nationalism, just to mention a few.

Good analysis, suspect timing. Dr Ndii is right about the Asian Tigers and the political progressives success stories in Africa - Botswana, Namibia, Cape Verde, Mauritius. But he ignores their cultural vantage - of singular industriousness and cohesion - which are a decisive success factor. The big elephant China of course is given a wide berth in his essay.

Maybe you can expound on the bold part.  I don't understand it in the context of this article.

China is an interesting place.  Over 1 billion people.  A country where most fraudulent activities are capital offenses.  The only reason he doesn't include them is lack of democracy.  But they seem like they could fit in just well considering all other facets.

Ndii contends the Asian Tigers are not benevolent dictatorships. That their rapid growth was fuelled by an older pre-existing merit system. He says dictatorship breeds corruption and cronysm which cause inefficiency - the Tigers were efficient enough to thrive as export economies and thus cannot have been dictatorships.

I think he ignores benevolence and dwells on dictatorship. It's what we have in China now and in the Tigers before. The totalitarian state that trumples individual rights for the common good. They aver corruption and such vices but more importantly they make consistent smart choices for the country.

It works well in the ASEAN because they have a cultural vantage point. One is a culture of industry. The Japanese and the Chinese have a singular ambitious nationalism. Even now there is a silent agreement between the Chinese and the government to forego some freedoms for development.

The other is cultural cohesion - same race and ethnicity.

Kenya lacks both advantages. We are lazy and entitled. Everyone whines about the sharing and not the baking. This leads to corruption. We are also culturally diverse which is a toxic mix.

Botswana and Namibia have cultural cohesion which has caused political and socioeconomic development. We are yet to see if the Chinese path works for Rwanda and Ethiopia where benevolent dictatorship is in pilot phase.
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Kenya Discussion / Re: NDII:Benevolent dictatorship is like snake oil
« Last post by Kichwa on October 22, 2017, 09:46:39 PM »
So, is Ndii right or right in saying that benevolent dictatorship will NOT work for Kenya given our diversity, no history of culture of efficiency and meritocracy,  lack of cultural cohesion, and non-existent history of sense of nationalism, just to mention a few.

Good analysis, suspect timing. Dr Ndii is right about the Asian Tigers and the political progressives success stories in Africa - Botswana, Namibia, Cape Verde, Mauritius. But he ignores their cultural vantage - of singular industriousness and cohesion - which are a decisive success factor. The big elephant China of course is given a wide berth in his essay.

Maybe you can expound on the bold part.  I don't understand it in the context of this article.

China is an interesting place.  Over 1 billion people.  A country where most fraudulent activities are capital offenses.  The only reason he doesn't include them is lack of democracy.  But they seem like they could fit in just well considering all other facets.

Ndii contends the Asian Tigers are not benevolent dictatorships. That their rapid growth was fuelled by an older pre-existing merit system. He says dictatorship breeds corruption and cronysm which cause inefficiency - the Tigers were efficient enough to thrive as export economies and thus cannot have been dictatorships.

I think he ignores benevolence and dwells on dictatorship. It's what we have in China now and in the Tigers before. The totalitarian state that trumples individual rights for the common good. They aver corruption and such vices but more importantly they make consistent smart choices for the country.

It works well in the ASEAN because they have a cultural vantage point. One is a culture of industry. The Japanese and the Chinese have a singular ambitious nationalism. Even now there is a silent agreement between the Chinese and the government to forego some freedoms for development.

The other is cultural cohesion - same race and ethnicity.

Kenya lacks both advantages. We are lazy and entitled. Everyone whines about the sharing and not the baking. This leads to corruption. We are also culturally diverse which is a toxic mix.

Botswana and Namibia have cultural cohesion which has caused political and socioeconomic development. We are yet to see if the Chinese path works for Rwanda and Ethiopia where benevolent dictatorship is in pilot phase.
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Kenya Discussion / Re: NDII:Benevolent dictatorship is like snake oil
« Last post by Robina on October 22, 2017, 09:39:19 PM »
Sorry Kenya lacks cultural cohesion which makes benevolent dictatorship tough. Ethiopia is struggling with that presently and perhaps we may learn something from them in future - should they dwarf our economy.

Kenya needs a miracle - given our incompetence and disunity. Not a single visionary; not one dollar-billionaire (except thieves and chemists); no industrialists, no builders. You will not even find a renaissance mind or nationalist in Kenya. Nigeria for example - while corrupt and divided - has a serious manpower asset. There are alot of serious economic and other thinkers in Nigeria compared to Kenya - hence the $T economy. High IQ per capita. So you have Nollywood, MTN and such brands... and all their award-winning writers.

Kenya - a country where the predominant debate is the sharing formula - rights - it means you have a surplus of freeloaders and a shortfall of producers.

Robina, Maybe in your detailed rejoinder  to Dr. Ndii, you can cite China's success story under dictatorship and why their model is perfect for Kenya to emulate.

Good analysis, suspect timing. Dr Ndii is right about the Asian Tigers and the political progressives success stories in Africa - Botswana, Namibia, Cape Verde, Mauritius. But he ignores their cultural vantage - of singular industriousness and cohesion - which are a decisive success factor. The big elephant China of course is given a wide berth in his essay.
Yes Robina,
Cherry picking but the idea of benevolent dictatorship is gaining currency and it needs countering. Haven’t seen nobody publicly attempting to do this
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Kenya Discussion / Re: NDII:Benevolent dictatorship is like snake oil
« Last post by Robina on October 22, 2017, 09:27:55 PM »
Good analysis, suspect timing. Dr Ndii is right about the Asian Tigers and the political progressives success stories in Africa - Botswana, Namibia, Cape Verde, Mauritius. But he ignores their cultural vantage - of singular industriousness and cohesion - which are a decisive success factor. The big elephant China of course is given a wide berth in his essay.

Maybe you can expound on the bold part.  I don't understand it in the context of this article.

China is an interesting place.  Over 1 billion people.  A country where most fraudulent activities are capital offenses.  The only reason he doesn't include them is lack of democracy.  But they seem like they could fit in just well considering all other facets.

Ndii contends the Asian Tigers are not benevolent dictatorships. That their rapid growth was fuelled by an older pre-existing merit system. He says dictatorship breeds corruption and cronysm which cause inefficiency - the Tigers were efficient enough to thrive as export economies and thus cannot have been dictatorships.

I think he ignores benevolence and dwells on dictatorship. It's what we have in China now and in the Tigers before. The totalitarian state that trumples individual rights for the common good. They aver corruption and such vices but more importantly they make consistent smart choices for the country.

It works well in the ASEAN because they have a cultural vantage point. One is a culture of industry. The Japanese and the Chinese have a singular ambitious nationalism. Even now there is a silent agreement between the Chinese and the government to forego some freedoms for development.

The other is cultural cohesion - same race and ethnicity.

Kenya lacks both advantages. We are lazy and entitled. Everyone whines about the sharing and not the baking. This leads to corruption. We are also culturally diverse which is a toxic mix.

Botswana and Namibia have cultural cohesion which has caused political and socioeconomic development. We are yet to see if the Chinese path works for Rwanda and Ethiopia where benevolent dictatorship is in pilot phase.
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